He always comes back.

odiedragon:

solitae:

leftenantreece:

2112tryptophanbonfires:

ANNIE - Official Trailer (2014)

I’m not gonna lie, I teared up a little bit when I saw the trailer.

I’m sooo excited for this… cheese fest and all!

this is so freaking adorable and yes i cried. I can’t wait.

I CAN’T WAIT

So I’ll probably get slammed for this (because, tumblr) but here goes anyway.  Ask box is open, slam away.

When the original Little Orphan Annie was written, chronologically we were a lot closer to a time where there was a strong bias against Irish people.  By making Annie red haired, it was implied that she was of Irish descent, and by extension, the audience would have inherently known that was part of the bias against her.

Changing Annie’s race to African American replicates this same dynamic in modern society, and that’s a big part of why so many people were upset by it.  A BLACK orphan?!  Nooooooo, keep her white and red haired and cute I DON’T WANT TO DEAL WITH HOW THIS IS MAKING ME UNCOMFORTABLE.

Casting Annie as black in 2014 is a much more true to the original character than casting her as a caucasian red head.

(Source: faineemae, via cannibalgraham)

Notes
150383
Posted
1 day ago
the-real-tina-belcher:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]


THIS IS ACTUALLY IMPORTANT

the-real-tina-belcher:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

THIS IS ACTUALLY IMPORTANT

(via sam-squats)

Notes
76232
Posted
1 day ago

Sgt. Thomas McVicar of the Jersey City Police Department shot 22 year old Kwadir Felton, leaving him blind, after Kwadir pulled a gun on him, he claims. Kwadir Felton denied the accusation, stating that he doesn’t even carry guns.

"I don’t understand!" Felton yelled at a police officer before his mother was removed from the courtroom. "You didn’t have to shoot me in the head for no reason! You trying to charge me with something I didn’t do!"

Sign the Change.org petition and get this story out there.

(Source: revolutionary-afrolatino, via huntingdemonswiththewinchesters)

Notes
194072
Posted
1 day ago

Reblog this if you like Supernatural. No questions, just do. It’ll make sense later.

something-human:

fallenfromthetardis:

lordzantrifreya:

how could one not reblog this?

I hope this is as fruitful as the Harry Potter one.

Re-blogging because the love is real

(Source: mrfizzlessaysyourelying, via thefuckingimpala)

Notes
92276
Posted
1 day ago

yolo-yoga:

sanhaim:

t-h-o-t-h:

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

i think we found the opposite of nash greir

I’m glad people are seeing this

As a guy, I agree with him 100% we are dicks and we are not worth it.

this is SOOO important to understand. Don’t change yourself for others.

(Source: the90sk-i-d-s, via healthyhappyemblem)

Notes
605330
Posted
2 days ago

noctstiel:

noctstiel:

1 minute of silence for everyone that can’t attend San Diego Comic Con 2013.

another minute of silence for everyone that can’t attend San Diego Comic Con 2014

(via thranduilsking)

Notes
35811
Posted
2 days ago
vaporware-femme:

theragin-cajun:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

ok this annoys the crap out of me, firstly the font in question costs a fortune, secondly no link to something that can change a persons life as it did mine, so here lemme fix both of those:http://opendyslexic.org/Open Source Dyslexia is a FREE font that is designed in a similar fashion as in weighting the letters, it is also being constantly updated, yer welcome

Hi for all of my disability friends, please bookmark opendyslexic this is a really great project! Tell your friends c:

vaporware-femme:

theragin-cajun:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

ok this annoys the crap out of me, firstly the font in question costs a fortune, secondly no link to something that can change a persons life as it did mine, so here lemme fix both of those:

http://opendyslexic.org/

Open Source Dyslexia is a FREE font that is designed in a similar fashion as in weighting the letters, it is also being constantly updated, yer welcome

Hi for all of my disability friends, please bookmark opendyslexic this is a really great project! Tell your friends c:

(via oestrogencookies)

Notes
16907
Posted
3 days ago

5columnsofhood:

stonerlukey:

ball’s in ur court ashton irwin

ashton’s next

(Source: bangmelikey0urdrums, via hilourry)

Notes
7371
Posted
3 days ago

Reblog if you wouldn’t mind some curious anons

(Source: daezilly, via fuckbeingfat-fitforsummer)

Notes
280878
Posted
3 days ago

jaclcfrost:

someonemayhavejust:

jaclcfrost:

sugar, we’re goin down [presses elevator button for a lower floor]

SWINGIN [ELEVATOR CABLE SNAPS]

this is

more than i bargained for

(via consistentdaydreams)

Notes
127273
Posted
4 days ago
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